ICWS 2005 and SCC2005 Keynote Presentations

 

Keynote 1: XML Data Services
Michael Carey (BEA)

Keynote 2: Web Services Composition: A Story of Models, Automata, and Logics
Richard Hull (Bell Labs, Lucent)

Keynote 3: Services Ecosystem
George M. Galambos, (IBM Global Services)

Keynote 4: Five years of Software as a Service: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Ephraim Feig (Kintera Inc.)


Keynote 1: XML Data Services

Michael J. Carey 
ACM Fellow
Member of the National Academy of Engineering
BEA Systems, Inc.

Abstract

We address the question, "In the brave new world of Web services and service-oriented architectures (SOA), how does data fit in?" We bring data modeling concepts to bear on the world of services, yielding an approach in which enterprise data access is handled by a collection of interrelated data services. We show how the approach can be realized on a foundation of XML standards, namely XML Schema, Web services, and XQuery. We show that this approach provides a uniform and declarative framework for integrating enterprise data assets that are drawn from disparate underlying sources, including both queryable and non-queryable data sources as well as data that is encapsulated by Web services. We also show that the approach yields data services that are easily and efficiently reusable.

About the speaker

Michael Carey is currently the architect for the Liquid Data product at BEA Systems, Inc. Dr. Carey manages the team responsible for "all things XQuery" at BEA, including uses of XQuery for data integration (in Liquid Data) and for application integration (in the data transformation engine of WebLogic Integration). Prior to joining BEA, his past lives include a stint at a Silicon Valley e-commerce startup, time at IBM Research working on DB2 and data integration related technologies, and a over a decade as a database faculty member in the Computer Sciences Department of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is an ACM Fellow and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.


Keynote 2: Web Services Composition: A Story of Models, Automata, and Logics

Richard Hull
Director of Network Data and Services Research
Bell Labs Research, Lucent Technologies
hull@lucent.com

Abstract

The web services paradigm promises to enable rich, flexible, and dynamic interoperation of highly distributed and heterogeneous web-hosted services. A key research challenge in web services concerns (semi-)automatic discovery and composition of web services, in order to construct new web services with desired properties or capabilities. This talk provides a survey of key developments that work towards this ambitious goal. The fundamental work in this area has centered on three models, each focused on different aspects of web services: OWL-S focuses on how web services interact with the "real world"; the "Roman" model focuses an abstract notion of "activities" and a internal process model based on automata; and the Conversation model focuses on messages passed between web services and again an automata-based internal process model. More recently, two efforts have attempted to provide a unified model that embraces all of the above elements. This talk provides an overview of these developments, including some of the formal results on automated composition, in an informal and intuitive style.

About the speaker

Richard Hull is Director of Network Data and Services Research at Bell Laboratories, a division of Lucent Technologies. Hull has broad research interests in the areas of data and information management. He has published over 75 journal and conference articles, and is co-author of the book "Foundations of Databases" (Addison-Wesley). Hull has served on or chaired numerous conference program committees, and is now Associate Editor of the ACM Transactions on Database Systems journal.

Hull received a Ph.D. degree in Mathematics from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1979. He spent many years on the faculty of Computer Science at the University of Southern California, and has spent numerous summers at INRIA in France. During that period Hull performed research on database theory, database models, and database programming languages, and his research was supported in part by grants from NSF, DARPA, AT&T, and U S WEST. Since joining Bell Labs, Hull's research has focused on e-services, pervasive computing, personalization, and data management. Hull has also been instrumental in the development of Lucent products in the areas of customer care, privacy-conscious personalization, and more broadly, for enabling the next generation of converged services that span telecom and the web.


Keynote 3: Services Ecosystem

George M. Galambos, Ph.D.
IBM Fellow
Chief Technology Officer, IBM Global Services Canada
galambos@ca.ibm.com

Abstract (To be announced)

About the speaker

Dr. Galambos is an IBM Fellow. In the past years he has led architecture and design engagements in the finance, insurance, transportation, and government industries. He has contributed as a core team member to the development and deployment of the ESS technical architecture. Prior to his role as a consulting architect, Dr. Galambos focused on IT strategy definition and on the design of high performance/high availability on-line systems and networks for large Canadian and international customers. He used this experience to coauthor IBM's End-to-End System Design Method. Current interests include performance and availability characteristics of the network computing model, the integration server design concept, and asset-based system design. He graduated as a chemical engineer from the Leningrad Technology Institute and received a Ph.D. degree in chemical engineering from the Budapest Technical University in 1972.


Keynote 4: Five years of Software as a Service: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Ephraim Feig, PhD
Chief Technology Officer and Chief Marketing Officer
Kintera, Inc.
efeig@kintera.com

Abstract

Software as a Service (SAS) was introduced with the promise of lowering the costs associated with business software applications. To enable SAS and similar software service deployments to function smoothly, Service-Oriented Architectures (SOAs) were introduced and have been quickly evolving for the past five years. Now, with SOAs well understood and software development environments so efficient, the return to insourcing, especially in the larger enterprises, is cutting into the earlier SAS gains. Providers for the mid-market, on the other hand, are wrestling with the dual problem- how to survive with on-demand requirements in a low margin arena? For many of the early pioneers in SAS and SOA, the past year has been one of tough demands from customers and harsh reactions from financial markets, as they continue to figure out how to survive in challenging, unchartered waters.

About the speaker

Ephraim Feig, Ph.D., is Chief Technology Officer and Chief Marketing Officer of Kintera, Inc. Prior to joining Kintera, Dr. Feig was employed at IBM from 1980 until 2000, where he most recently held the positions of Program Director of Emerging Technologies in the Research Division and Program Director of Media Platforms in the Internet Division. Dr. Feig was elected Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers for his technical contributions in the field of signal processing and has been issued 22 patents and has more than 20 patent applications pending. Dr. Feig has published more than 100 technical articles in journals and conference proceedings. Dr. Feig has served as an adjunct professor at several universities, including Columbia University, The City College of New York and New York Polytechnic Institute. He is an executive committee member of the IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Services Computing.